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ABOUT INDONESIA

Weather
Tropical climate varying from region to region. The eastern monsoon brings the driest weather (June to September), while the western monsoon brings the main rains (December to March). Rainstorms can occur all year. Higher regions are cooler, especially at night.

The country is hot and humid all year round, but cooler inland than along the coastal regions, the monsoon from December to March brings the heavy rains. The dry season from April to October is the best time to visit as some activities and road travel can be difficult during the rainy season.

Clothing
Lightweights with rainwear. Warmer clothes on occasion and it is regarded inappropriate to wear brief clothes anywhere other than the beach or at sports facilities. Women should observe the Muslim dress code that requires shoulders and legs to be kept covered.

Language
Bahasa Indonesia is the official language, but many dialects are spoken throughout the many islands. English is widely understood in Jakarta and tourist resorts.

Electricity
Electrical current is 120/230 volts, 50 Hz. A variety of plugs are in use including the European two-pin and UK-style three-pin.

Time
Indonesia spans three time zones. GMT +7 (West, including Java and Sumatra), GMT +8 (Central, including Bali, Sulawesi and Lombok), GMT +9 (East, including Irian Jaya).

Communications
The international access code for Indonesia is +62. The outgoing code is 001 or 007 followed by the relevant country code (e.g. 001 61 for Australia); when using VOIP, the outgoing code is 017. It is not necessary to dial the first zero of the area code. City/area codes are in use, e.g. 36 for Bali and 21 for Jakarta. For operator-assisted international calls, phone 101. The local mobile phone operators use GSM networks and have roaming agreements with most international operators. Internet cafes are available in the main towns and resorts.
 


Currency
Rupiah (IDR) is the official currency and is divided into 100 sen. Foreign currency can easily be exchanged at banks, hotels and authorized money changers in major tourist destinations. US dollars is the most accepted currency. Cash often yields a better exchange rate than traveler cheques, which are not always accepted. It is recommended that traveler cheques also be in US dollars. Most major credit cards are accepted at hotels, restaurants and stores catering to the tourist trade. ATMs are available in all main centers. Small change is often unavailable so keep small denomination notes and coins for items like bus fares, temple donations and cool drinks.

Rupiah Denominations

Coins
    25 Rupiah (metal alloy and aluminum)
    50 Rupiah (metal alloy and aluminum)
   100 Rupiah (metal alloy and aluminum)
   200 Rupiah (metal alloy and aluminum)
   500 Rupiah (metal alloy and aluminum)
1,000 Rupiah (gold-silver bimetallic, rare)

Banknotes
   1,000 Rupiah (green-red)
   5,000 Rupiah (green-brown)
  10,000 Rupiah (purple)
  20,000 Rupiah (green)
  50,000 Rupiah (blue)
100,000 Rupiah (red)
 

Current IDR exchange rates - as of January, 2010
1 AUD = Rp 8,500
1 USD = Rp 9,380
1 EUR = Rp 13,190
1 JPY  = Rp 10,440
1 SGD = Rp 6,690
1 GBP = Rp 15,170
1 CNY = Rp 1,380
 
 
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Duty Free
Travelers to Indonesia over 18 years do not have to pay duty on 50 cigars, 200 cigarettes or 100g tobacco; alcohol up to 1 liter; perfume for personal use; and personal goods to the value of US$250 per passenger or US$1,000 per family. Prohibited items include Chinese medicines and prints, narcotics, firearms and ammunition, pornography, cordless telephones, fresh fruit or goods to be used for commercial gain.


Emergency
Emergencies: 110 (Police); 118 (Ambulance).

 

Home : About Indonesia : Food & Dining : History : Society & Culture : Islands of Indonesia : Lombok : Gili Islands : Bali :
: Komodo : Flores : Sumbawa : Sumba : Nusa Penida Group : Learn Indonesian : Accommodation Guide : Activities :
: Surfing Indonesia: Contact Us:

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